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Photo by Sharla Vantine: Shorty after voting to approve beer and wine sales in Plains, beer trucks rolled into the Allsups in Plains to make the first delivery to the area.

by Sharla Vantine
Special to TownTalk News
info@www.towntalkradio.com

The beer trucks were the first seen rolling into the Allsup’s parking lot this week to stock coolers prepared for the first the inventory of beer.

Allsup‘s received their permit on Monday morning.

“We weren’t expecting a delivery until later in the week,” said the store manager. “They had received a phone call from a supervisor that morning saying that deliveries were already on the way.

“The first and second day our sales had already doubled,” the manager added. “We are just going day by day.”

The beer companies are watching to see what sells and what does not and is taking into consideration what the customers are wanting. There have already been beer requests for Bud Select, Blue Moon, Bud Light Lime, among others.

Allsup’s is currently the only store selling beer, however, Uncle’s recently submitted their request for a permit, which was signed by the city of Plains, and can take anywhere from two to four weeks to be approved at the state level.

“Lowe’s Grocery has requested a variance waiver because the distance measurement in the ordinance is too close to the school for them to obtain a permit,” said City Manager, Terry Howard. “The City Council met with the School Board and discussed the request. The approval or rejection of the variance request will be voted on at the next City Council meeting.”

BLUE BELL BACK IN PLAINS

In addition to the alcohol drought, the citizens of Plains have also survived the Blue Bell famine of 2015 and are now eagerly feeding their cravings since its return to the shelves on Monday.

Lowe’s had been announcing the upcoming arrival in Plains with much anticipation. The first delivery was finally made after the nine-month break.

Blue Bell made the decision to remove its product from the shelves back in April when they became linked to several cases of listeria, which resulted in three deaths in Kansas.